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The Philadelphia-based rapper just released his latest album Luv is Rage 2, which sits at the second spot on the Billboard 200. This is following his single, “XO Tour Llif3,” which dominated the summer and became arguably the song of the year with over 1.3 billion streams to date. Unsurprisingly, this has led to an uptick in the attention and publicity Uzi is getting.

Whether or not the 23-year-old can handle all this weight is an entirely different conversation —although (unprompted) videos of him stapling his own head might suggest he can’t. But the one interesting question that’s risen from all of Uzi’s recent coverage is his religion. While he hasn’t explicitly said anything about his beliefs, many things point to him being Satan or the anti-Christ, or—more realistically—a devil worshipper. And the signs are plentiful:

His jewelry

Lil Uzi is known for rocking a necklace with a diamond-encrusted, upside-down cross — a symbol synonymous with the anti-Christ — on it. This has drawn a lot of criticism from those who aren’t big fans of Uzi messing around with higher powers. Migos member Offset openly went at Uzi for the necklace, which set off some beef between the two rappers.

His Twitter bio

The bio on Uzi’s account, which has 2.1 million followers, reads, “Luv is R6ge 2 Coming Soon ® I once w6s the DEVUL backw6rds…LUVED® SEMICOLON Lifestyl3.” Amongst that mess of numbers and misspelled words is not only an obvious reference to the devil or “devul,” but three 6s, too. For anyone who doesn’t know, “666” is another symbol associated with Satan.

The “XO Tour Llif3” music video

Lil Uzi recently released a music video for the song that ruled the airwaves for months. Along with the zombies and blood in the video that fit right into Uzi’s devil-worshipping aesthetic, the video had Arabic subtitles. What was interesting to a lot of people about these subtitles (other than them being in Arabic for no apparent reason) was that they were written to be read left-to-right, despite the fact that Arabic is written right-to-left. While many saw this as nothing more than an ignorant oversight, some were quick to point out the fact that backwards Arabic is used with black magic, a practice often associated with—you guessed it—the devil.

His name

To most people, the name “Lil Uzi Vert” doesn’t mean anything. In fact, it seems like some random words he threw together. Uzi has said the name originates from a friend of his saying Lil Uzi raps fast like a little machine gun — an Uzi is a small automatic gun — and from then on, he was Lil Uzi. But is there another meaning? When his name is said quickly, it sounds roughly like “Lucifer” which is another name for Satan. Try it now. Noticing a pattern here?

Luv is Rage 2

Lastly, there is Lil Uzi’s summer album. Throughout the record you can hear Uzi quickly adlib his name, showing exactly how much it sounds like “Lucifer”. Then there’s the second track on the album, titled “444+222”. Perhaps it’s a somewhat-witty response to Jay-Z’s most recent album, 4:44, on which Jay criticizes some of the habits of the younger generation of rappers; however, as some you quick mathematicians have probably figured out by now, 444 plus 222 equals Satan’s favorite number: 666.

In reality, it’s entirely possible likely that this Satan stuff is just a gimmick crafted up by the marketing geniuses over at Atlantic Records (the label Lil Uzi is signed to.) But, it’s also entirely possible Uzi actually worships the devil; or, at the very least, likes to play around with the ideas of black magic and Satan. There are simply too many signs for this to be a coincidence. But if Uzi does worship Satan, who am I—or any of us, for that matter—to judge?

Eric DePaz
ericdepazjerk@gmail.com
Eric DePaz is a sophomore advertising major who might just be the most extra person you know. Catch him on campus in his all-white Air Force Ones listening to rap and talking bout how much he loves his hometown of Buffalo, NY. Oh and yes, pineapple DOES belong on pizza.

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